Contractor RMOs for Hire

The CSLB released their Winter 2015-16 newsletter last week. One article discussed contractor RMOs for hire.CSLB Gestapo Tactics

Section 7068.1 of the Business and Professions code states: …”responsible for exercising that direct supervision and control of his or her employer’s or principal’s construction operations to secure compliance with this chapter and the rules and regulations of the board.” And Code 823(b) states: “For purposes of Section 7068.1 of the Code, “direct supervision and control” includes any one or any combination of the following activities: supervising construction, managing construction activities by making technical and administrative decisions, checking jobs for proper workmanship, or direct supervision on construction job sites.”

823 states “any one or any combination,” so if you are using an RMO that is not directly related to your business you need to ensure that he/she is following these guidelines.

I talk to people almost daily who need to use an RMO who is not directly related to their business. I tell them that the RMO must be involved in the construction activities that will be conducted under the license and the same rules and responsibilities apply as they do to the license they currently hold.

What I think is at issue here is the broad definition of “direct supervision and control.” Does the RMO need to be on the job site to manage or make technical and admin decisions? Not according to the law. Remember, it states “any one or any combination” is allowed, that suggests “direct supervision on construction job sites” does not have to be a mandatory choice.

With this ambiguity I’m left wondering what the CSLB gestapo task force is finding during their “investigations”, what are they citing these contractors with, and what are the criminal cases truly about?

I’m sure any attorney worth his hourly fee would be able to punch holes in any CSLB case that involved 7068.1 and 823. So if you are using an RMO or you are an RMO and you do not have a direct relationship with the business, I suggest you become as active as possible with the work being done. Log all phone calls, keep all emails, review contracts and sign them if possible, review photographs, and yes… even drop by the job site if you can (even though the law cited by the CSLB does not require it).

Last comment…. if this is such a big problem that the CSLB had to create a “task force”, why don’t they just amend or remove B&P Code 7068.1? Get rid of the 20% rule altogether? Or is it easier to create an unregulated task force, pry into the business activities of licensee’s, write citations and criminal cases, and collect 100’s of thousands of dollars? Well…. they even say it themselves… “yielded big dividends”!

Full CSLB article below

RMOs-for-Hire Better Know What They’re Getting Into

CSLB has zeroed in on licensees who rent their services as Responsible Managing Officers (RMOs) for companies over which they have little or no control. Due to the work of a special CSLB task force that targets suspected RMO abuses, those who act as little more than paid license qualifier for companies are being identified and disciplined for violating state contractor law.

Contractors who serve as qualifiers for a company’s construction operations must exercise direct control and supervision, and, by law, maintain at least a 20 percent ownership stake in each firm for which the person acts as a qualifier. Business and Professions Code (BPC) section 7068.1 authorizes CSLB to discipline the licensed entity when the qualifier is not actively involved in the construction activities of the license they are representing. In addition to administrative penalties, the individual falsely serving as a qualifier on the license can be charged with a misdemeanor and be sentenced to serve up to six months in jail, and required to pay a fine of up to $5,000, or both.

CSLB’s effort to uncover straw men RMOs has yielded big dividends. There have been a total of 304 complaints filed against those suspected of misusing their qualifier status (many still under investigation), 31 accusations filed to revoke or suspend a license, 12 citations issued for violations of contractor law, 11 criminal cases filed by local district attorney’s offices, and $215,000 in restitution ordered for wronged consumers.

CSLB has strong words of caution for those who would enter these arrangements: If you act as an RMO and do not have active and financial involvement in the construction and business operations, you risk CSLB administrative penalties against your license(s) as well as criminal prosecution, regardless of whether you’re aware of substandard work being performed by unqualified individuals.

The task force also is watching for exam waiver requests from applicants suspected of only seeking to rent their name for a fee. CSLB also will seek to revoke qualifier status previously granted to anyone whose actions demonstrate they do not have an ownership stake or are not active decision makers listed on a license.

A review of BPC section 7065 will provide further explanation of examination waiver laws.

End of article

Very last comment…. do I think the CSLB should be taking action against the extremely small percentage of contractor RMOs for hire? Yes.  Should they create an unregulated task force with no oversight to invade the businesses of California contractors? …. Not just no, but hell no!

Please follow and like us:

What You Need to Know About Enforcement Actions by the Contractors State License Board

What You Need to Know About Enforcement Actions by the Contractors State License Board

I questioned whether to even write this post.

Because, of course, YOU would never find yourself hightailing it out of town  with the California Contractor’s State License Board (“CSLB”) sniffing down your tail pipes.

Then again, mistaken identities occur all the time. So, here’s what you need to know if the CSLB mistakes you for one of “those” contractors.

What violations are subject to CSLB enforcement actions?

The CSLB can take enforcement actions based on any one of numerous violations set forth under the California Business and Professions Code (“B&P Code”), including:

  1. B&P Code §7107: Abandonment of a construction project or operation without legal excuse.
  2. B&P Code §7108: Diversion or misapplication of funds or property received for prosecution or completion of a construction project or operation.
  3. B&P Code §7108.5: Failure to pay a subcontractor not later than 7 days after receipt of each progress payment, unless otherwise agreed to in writing or in the absence of a good faith dispute over the amount due.
  4. B&P Code §7108.6: Failure to pay transportation charged submitted by a dump truck carrier, unless otherwise agreed to in writing or in the absence of a good faith dispute over the charges claimed.
  5. B&P Code §7109: Willful departure from or disregard of accepted trade standards or plans and specifications.
  6. B&P Code §7109.5: Violation of a safety provision under the California Labor Code (Labor Code section 6300 et seq.) resulting in death or serious injury to an employee.
  7.  B&P Code §7110: Willful or deliberate disregard of building, safety, labor, workers compensation, unemployment, the Subletting and Subcontracting Fair Practices Act, or violation of the California Health and Safety Code or California Water Code relating to digging, boring, or drilling of water wells.
  8. B&P Code §7110.1: Requiring a release from an unpaid laborer in violation of the California Labor Code (Labor Code section 206.5).
  9. B&P Code §7110.5: Being found by the California Labor Commissioner to have willful or deliberately violated the Labor Code.
  10. B&P Code §7111: Failure to make and keep records showing all contracts, documents, records, receipts and disbursements for a period of 5 years after completion of a construction project or operation.
  11. B&P Code §7111.1: Failure or refusal to respond to a written request by the CSLB to cooperate in the investigation of a complaint against the licensee.
  12. B&P Code §§7112 and 7112.1: Omitting or misrepresenting a material fact when obtaining or renewing a license or adding a classification to an existing license.
  13. B&P Code §7113: Failing to complete a construction project or operation for the price stated in the contract or in any modification to the contract.
  14. B&P Code §7113.5: Avoiding or settling of an obligation for less than the full amount through: (a) composition, arrangement, or reorganization with creditors under state law; (b) composition, arrangement, or reorganization with creditors under any agreement or understanding; (c) receivership; (d) assignment for the benefit of creditors; (e) trusteeship; or (f) dissolution, unless discharged or settled in bankruptcy under federal law.
  15. B&P Code §7114: Aiding or abetting an unlicensed person with an intent to evade the License Law.
  16. B&P Code §7114.1: Signing a falsified certificate of experience or certifying false or misleading experience.
  17. B&P Code §7114.2: Displaying a canceled, revoked, suspended, or fraudulently altered license, using a fictitious license or document simulating a license, lending a license to another person, or knowingly permitting the unlawful use of a license.
  18. B&P Code §7115: Failure to comply with the License Law or engaging in collusion under California Public Contracts Code section 7106.
  19. B&P Code §7116: Willfully or fraudulently injuring another.
  20. B&P Code §7116.5: Engaging in conduct that subverts or attempts to subvert an investigation by the CSLB.
  21. B&P Code §7117: Acting in the capacity of a contractor under a license that is not his or hers or with personnel not identified under the license.
  22. B&P Code §7117.5: Acting in the capacity of a contractor under an inactive, suspended, or expired license.
  23. B&P Code §7117.6: Acting in the capacity of a contractor in a classification other than a classification currently held.
  24. B&P Code §7118: Entering into a contract with an unlicensed contractor.
  25. B&P Code §7118.4: Failure, by a contractor who has made an inspection to determine the presence of asbestos, to disclose orally and in writing that there is an ownership or financial relationship with a contractor performing corrective work.
  26. B&P Code §7118.5: Knowingly or negligently entering into a contract with a person who is not certified to engage in asbestos-related work.
  27. B&P Code §7118.6: Knowingly or negligently entering into a contract with a person who is not certified to engage in hazardous waste remediation.
  28. B&P Code §7119: Willful failure or refusal to to diligently prosecute a construction project or operation without legal excuse.
  29. B&P Code §7120: Willful or deliberate failure to pay money when due for materials or services rendered or false denial of any amount due or the validity of a claim with intent to secure a discount or delay.
  30. B&P Code §7121: Employing or associating as an officer, director, partner, manager, qualifier or one of the personnel of record of a licensee, a person whose license was previously denied, suspended, or revoked, or who had knowledge of or participate in acts of an organization which had its license previously denied, suspended, or revoked.
  31. B&P Code §7121.5: Employing or associating as an officer, director, partner, manager, or qualifier, a qualifier of an organization which has had its license revoked or suspended, regardless of whether he or she had knowledge of or participated in any acts of the  organization which led to its license being revoked or suspended.
  32. B&P Code §7123: Being convicted of a crime substantially related to the qualifications, functions and duties of a contractor.
  33. B&P Code §7123.5: Overpricing work following an emergency or major disaster.

What happens when a complaint is filed or enforcement action initiated against my license?

The CSLB may initiate enforcement action on its own. However, more typically, a complaint is filed against a license. The License Law states that “any person” may file a complaint against a license. Usually, however, a complaint is filed by an owner or another contractor, subcontractor, material supplier or employee.

Complaints based on patent defects must be filed within 4 years after the act or omission. Complaints based on latent defects must be filed within 10 years after the act or omission. And complaints based on misrepresentations of material facts, or based on criminal conduct, must be filed within 2 years of discovery.

When a complaint is filed it is processed at the CSLB Intake and Mediation Center nearest the location where the alleged violation occurred. If the complaint is found to fall within the CSLB’s jurisdiction the CSLB will send confirmation of receipt of the complaint to the complainant and a notice to the contractor.

  1. Notice of Possible Violation: The notice to the contractor will usually request information as to whether a settlement has been reached, whether a settlement was offered but not accepted, whether the contractor contends that no violation exists, or if there is further information the contractor would like to share with the CSLB.
  2. Investigation: If a complaint is not resolved, a CSLB consumer services representative (CSR) will contact the complainant and the contractor to request additional information and documentation and attempt to mediate the dispute. If the CSR determines that further investigation is necessary, he or she can assign the case to an enforcement representative (ER) who will conduct an investigation by requesting further information and documents, and conducting interviews, to determine whether there is clear and convincing evidence of a violation of the License Law.
  3. CSLB-Sponsored Arbitration: In certain cases, the CSLB can refer the parties to the CSLB-sponsored arbitration program. The CSLB-sponsored arbitration program is only available if: (a) the dispute involves damages greater than $12,500 but less than $50,000; (b) the contractor has a license in good standing; (c) the contractor does not have a history of repeated or similar violations; (d)  the contractor does not currently have a disciplinary action pending against him or her; and (e) the parties have not previously agreed to arbitrate or are willing to waive a contractual agreement to arbitrate. The CSLB-sponsored arbitration program is voluntary, unless the damages are equal to or below $12,500, in which case arbitration can be mandated. If the  parties participate in the CSLB-sponsored arbitration the arbitrator’s decision is binding.
  4. CSLB Enforcement Action: Once an investigation is concluded the CSLB may take one or more of the following actions: (a) issue a warning letter; (b) issue a citation; (c) file an accusation; or (d) close the complaint because the parties’  settled, for lack of evidence, or because it found no violation. In rare instances, the CSLB may seek injunctive relief with the courts or refer the matter to a local prosecutor for the filing of criminal charges.

What is a warning letter?

If a violation is found but the contractor’s actions are not egregious and the contractor’s history does not reflect a patter of violations the CSLB may just send a warning letter to the contractor. A warning letter remains a matter of record and could support more serious action against a contractor if further violations occur.

What is a citation?

If a contractor is found to have violated the License Law, the CSLB may issue a citation imposing a civil penalty payable to the CSLB as well as an order of restitution requiring the contractor to either correct deficiencies and/or pay for the damages of the complainant. Civil penalties on a single construction project, no matter the number of violations, cannot exceed $5,000. However, if a contractor is found to have contracted with an unlicensed contractor or have aided and abetted an unlicensed contractor a civil penalty of up to $15,000 may be assessed.

A contractor may appeal a citation by giving notice to the CSLB within 15 days of service of the citation by the CSLB. If a contractor appeals the citation, a hearing is held before the Registrar of Contractors who may revoke, modify, or affirm a citation. A mandatory settlement conference before the hearing may also be conducted.

If a contractor does not appeal or fails to appeal a citation within 15 days of service of the citation by the CSLB, the citation becomes final. If a contractor fails to comply with a citation it will result in the automatic suspension of his or her license 30 days after noncompliance with the terms of the citation. A contractor may contest the determination of noncompliance by giving notice to the CSLB within 15 days of service of a notice of noncompliance by the CSLB. If a contractor continues to fail to comply with a citation it will result in the automatic revocation of his or her license 90 days after the date of automatic suspension.

What is an accusation?

The most serious violations are subject to the filing of an accusation. In an accusation, the CSLB seeks to suspend or revoke a contractor’s license, and begins with the CSLB filing an accusation which is similar to a complaint filed in superior court and includes an allegation of claims. A contractor has 15 days from service of an accusation by the CSLB to file a notice of defense.

The Administrative Procedures Act (Government Code sections 11500 et seq.) govern accusations, including limited discovery of names and addresses of witnesses, statements taken, investigative reports, and documents sought to be admitted as evidence. A mandatory settlement conference before the hearing may be conducted.

At the hearing before the Administrative Law Judge (“ALJ”) the burden is on the CSLB to prove by clear and convincing evidence that a contractor’s license should be suspended or revoked. The rules of evidence, however, are typically more relaxed. Following the hearing, the ALJ will issue a proposed decision.

The CSLB may adopt the proposed decision in whole or in part or may enter its own ruling. The CSLB can also request that additional evidence be heard. The decision of the ALJ becomes a final decision 30 days after service of proposed decision unless reconsideration is requested.

A contractor who is unhappy with a decision can seek judicial relief by filing a petition for peremptory writ of administrative mandamus in the superior court. The peremptory writ provisions of California Code of Civil Procedure section 1094.5 govern writs and require the superior court to conduct an independent review of the record. The parties may also appeal the decision of the superior court to the court of appeal.

Contractors who lose an accusation may be required to pay the CSLB’s investigative and enforcement costs which can be in the tens of thousands of dollars. A contractor whose license is suspended may be reinstated upon proof of the contractor’s compliance with the conditions of suspension or, in the absence of such conditions, the discretion of the CSLB. A contractor whose license is revoked may not reinstate their license for a minimum of one year or up to a maximum of five years. A contractor will also be required to file a disciplinary bond.

How does the CSLB address complaints against unlicensed contractors?

Unlicensed contractors, as opposed to licensed contractors, don’t have a license which can be suspended or revoked. When the CSLB receives a complaint against an unlicensed contractor the CSLB may issue a citation including an order of abatement to cease and desist and a civil penalty up to $15,000, file a criminal action with the local district attorney’s office, or initiate injunction proceedings in the superior court.

Unlicensed contractors have 15 days from service of an administrative citation by the CSLB to appeal a citation. If an unlicensed contractor appeals a citation, a hearing is held before the Registrar of Contractors who may revoke, modify, or affirm a citation. A mandatory settlement conference before the hearing may also be conducted.

view post: What You Need to Know About Enforcement Actions by the Contractors State License Board

 

Please follow and like us:

How to fill out the CSLB Work Experience Form

How to fill out the CSLB Work Experience Form. The first step toward receiving a California Contractors License.

2013 has been full of changes when it comes to the CSLB License Application. It used to be the experience outline could make or break your application. Now, it’s only a minor player for eight of the 43 license classifications.

Although, a properly formatted CSLB work experience form for all 43 classifications is important, preparing a proper experience outline for the eight critical classifications is just the first step.

How to fill out the cslb work experience form

[Read more…]

Please follow and like us:

CSLB Qualifying Experience – Final Part

Conclusion to: CSLB Qualifying Experience – Final Part, I will be discussing the CSLB Qualifying Experience outline and process. Final Part

Below are a set of powerpoint slides that were shown at the recent Contractors State License Board Licensing Committee Meeting held at the CSLB office in Sacramento on October 21, 2013.

Along the way, I’ll add my advice and opinion where necessary. Click on the images to enlarge.

CSLB Qualifying Experience - Final Part

Slides #25-26

These slides are self explanatory. You should refrain from using words like; he, she, I, we, us, or your personal name. The experience should always begin with… Experience includes…. then list your daily trade duties performed in the field. Remember…. do NOT list administrative experience.

CSLB Qualifying Experience - Final Part Slides #27-28Slide #27 gives some stats of applications received, processed, rejected. I think these numbers are way too low and don’t encompass what exactly is taking place.Slide #28 states this application processing procedure ensuring that the applicant has the proper experience. Isn’t that what the test is for? Could anybody just walk in and take the exams without any trade experience? I say, let the exams be the lithmus test!After that the slide states that the application processing procedure benefits the applicant in both cost and time. This one blows me away! How is it benefitting the applicant in cost when the chance of their $300 application filing fee disappears? According to them, it happens to 34.2% of the applications every month. And that number doesn’t include the applications that were withdrawn or denied after it was sent to formal investigation.
CSLB Qualifying Experience - Final Part Slide #29States this process frees up enforcement division resources to pursue the most questionable applications. Again, who is determining what “most questionable” is and what is their criteria? The application that uses “he” or “she” in the experience outline? Then it goes on to state that it takes less time than a formal investigation… let’s see… it’s currently taking “non” formal investigations almost 2 months for the applicant to receive the reject letter, return the docs, and have them reviewed. Looks like a push to me. Either way, you’re going to be waiting 3-4 months before your application is even posted and an exam date issued. From there, you’re waiting another 3-4 weeks before you sit for your exams.

That concludes this series of posts “CSLB Qualifying Experience – Final Part” regarding the Contractors State License Board Licensing Committee meeting and powerpoint slide presentation. The bottom line is… have all of your ducks in a row before you submit your application. And I would recommend that you have me review your application and your work experience history first. Paying me $75 could save you $300 and months of heart ache.

Please follow and like us:

Contractors License Experience Outline

I wanted to take a few moments to discuss the importance of creating a properly formatted California Contractors License experience outline.

For every trade, there are a few keywords the CSLB application technician is looking for. For the B classification, they want to see framing and at least two unrelated trades listed.

What I see too often is administrative duties being listed on the app. The CSLB won’t accept that as valid experience because they assume that if you are going into business, you should already know how to take care of the business, or administrative side of things.

  • Don’t list: Preparing contracts
  • Do list: Duties specific to your trade
  • Don’t list: Reviewing plans
  • Do list: What you do daily on the job site
  • Don’t list: Decision making
  • Do list: Key elements of your trade classification
  • Don’t list: Specific projects. Make it an overall outline of your trade duties
contractors license experience outline

These are the basics. If you need help preparing your CSLB contractors license experience outline or application, send me an email, a text, or call and I’d be happy to help you.

Please follow and like us:

Contractors License Schools

Many contractors license schools offer guarantees. Who should you believe?

I found an interesting blog post today put out by one of my competitors.

What’s interesting about it is that the whole post is basically and advertisement for their company wrapped in a neat little “information” wrapper.

Now, I’m not saying that what was written was entirely incorrect, just some of it. And my service was not included, so I guess I should be thankful. I can only assume I wasn’t included because I don’t fraudulently call myself a “school” like they do.

What’s wrong?

My main issue (as I stated above) has always been and remains to be so today, is that these places call themselves “schools.” They are not educators teaching you your trade. They, just like all of us, are there to assist you in passing your exams. So it’s a wonder that this company and others like it continue to be allowed to use the word “school.”

Driving School – teaches you how to drive
Mechanic School – teaches you how to turn a wrench
Culinary School – teaches you how to cook
Contractors School – teaches you how to perform a trade? NO! They show you have to pass a state exam. Period.

Case in point… a good friend of mine, who happens to have a master’s in education and a teaching degree was offered $50,000 to be an instructor at one of the contractors license schools. Can he teach? You bet! Did he know anything about construction? Not a single thing! Degree or no degree, how can someone teach you: 1) what you should already know, and 2) something that he doesn’t know?

Anyway… moving on… (their post is below)

Beware??? Who closed their doors and made this company the contractors license schools police.

Being a member of the BBB means nothing. The BBB is just a membership club that gives its “paying” members higher scores. Pay their fee, you get a high score. The BBB is not a regulatory agency and has no authority over anything or anybody.

Claims having over 650 practice test questions? It appears this company believes the material they make up is the best on the market. So not true!

Claims to complete your application for you? This is a service I offer, and yes, I do take the information from the applicant and fill out their form. But, being a former cslb app tech, I can’t tell you how many apps I rejected because the applicant may have had all the necessary information, but failed to put it in the app the correct way. “Schools” that don’t let you take the study materials home? I suggest, don’t bother going to one of these “schools” in the first place.

“Schools” that DO NOT offer a guaranty. Really? Have you read any of the guarantee’s offered by these “schools”? One says you have to prove that you’ve taken the test several times, have requested and studied their “updated” materials, then and only then, will they give you any money back. What a joke. That would take a year, and only if you followed all twelve steps they want you to follow. If their materials were any good, you would have passed the first time and not needed several attempts to pass.

Schools claiming to be “State Certified” contractors license schools?? Wait.. so it’s ok to call yourself a “school” but don’t you dare call yourself a State Certified contractors license school? C’mon!

The post stated:

BEWARE of Schools that offer or don’t offer the following:

Schools that are NOT Members of the Better Business Bureau
Claims over 650 practice test questions per course
Claims having On-Line course at this time
Claiming to complete your application for you
Claims they can set the State Exam date for you
Schools that DON’T let you take or keep your study materials
Schools that service Licensing for Multiple States
Schools that offer large discounts
Schools claiming to be a “State Certified” Schools

Next, they state:
It is difficult to select a Contractors Licensing School over the internet. You should be aware of the consumer’s issues and we have completed an intensive analysis of the current Contractors Schools Market.

My response:

They have completed an “intensive analysis” of the current Contractors license schools market? Really? They compared 4 out of the 40 they say are in existence. Apparently this poster didn’t read anything he wrote after he wrote it. Note, I’m not giving away the identity of this “school” or the other contractors license schools they analyzed because they would just end up emailing me to tell me how right I am, and I hate it when they do that.

Next, they posted:

All schools listed INCLUDE:

Specializes in California State Contractors Licensing
Home Study for Contractors Trade Courses
Study Manuals for Trade and Law & Business
Course Instruction Classes on Audio CDs
California State License Forms and Applications
Standard Telephone and Email Support
A minimum of 400 practice test questions per course
Allows you to keep your study Materials after Exam
Home study courses and study manuals? Pretty much the same thing!
Course instruction classes on audio cd’s? How about audio and video like the materials I sell.

CSLB forms can be downloaded by anyone, anytime from the CSLB website. It’s nice of this company to include this in their list, but every service or “school” provides these. I even email the forms to people who aren’t my clients! They call looking for the form, I send it to them.

How does this company get to decide that 400 practice questions are acceptable? Is that a number they just pulled out of thin air? They say “beware” of materials with over 650 questions because they know that the materials I and others sell from a publisher with 30+yrs in this business offer the most comprehensive practice exams with that many practice questions. And they know that they are far superior to what any “school” has created.

contractors license schools

Final comment about guarantee’s:

I don’t offer one because:
I have no control over how you study and how long you study
I have no control over how you retain information
I have no control over how well you take tests
I have no control over your state of mind when you are taking the tests

I can only state that 98% of people who use the materials I offer pass their exams. After that, it’s all up to you! Besides that, a guaranty suggests that the materials being offered are not worth the money you paid for them. A guaranty is not going to make some “schools” materials any better.

Final final comment about guarantee’s:

Why would you buy materials from a company that feels they need to offer a guaranty, go thru all of that studying, taking the tests, failing because the contractors license schools materials were substandard, only then to jump thru their hoops to get your money back and have to buy quality materials from another company (The Contractors License Guru) so that you can pass the tests!

Guaranty from the company discussed above?

My favorite is #15… 200% Refund. No Questions Asked. LOL You only have to jump thru 14 simple hoops to get there AND #7 says they’ll tell you when YOU can re-test! No thank you!

To obtain your 200% Refund follow these Simple steps;

Enough Study Time; You must provide yourself adequate time for study. Typically a minimum of 4 to 6 weeks is needed to prepare for each per course.

When you get your Exam date; Email us at …@Schools.com and include your Name, Trade, Order# Date of Purchase and Fax# or call us at xxx-xxx-xxxx.

We will fax you any Course Updates (within 48 hours) that have been created since your original course date. Review and study the new updated exam questions.
On the day of your Exam; note any information that you were required to know for the state exams that was not covered in our course materials.

After the Exam; email us your feedback on any additional course questions you may have or we didn’t’t cover in our classes to: …@Schools.com, or fax them to (xxx-xxx-xxxx), or call us at (xxx-xxx-xxxx).

If you fail the state exams for any reason; FAX your State Exam Failure Notice to us at (xxx-xxx-xxxx) and continue to study. Call us at xxx-xxx-xxxx to discuss any additional study materials or answers to questions you may have.

Do not Re-Schedule your Exam until advised; we will stay in contact with you until you get the additional study materials you need to pass. It is best to re-schedule your Exam Date only after you are ready for the Exam. We will review each of your questions; our editors will review your feedback and send you additional study materials and updates.

When you receive your updates; replace any old questions and answers with the new ones and study any additional questions, answers and explanations.

Re-Schedule your Exam Date; re-schedule your exam date ONLY after you have received your updates, studied your materials and feel you are ready for the Exam.

If you do not pass the second time; repeat the above instructions and send us your additional feedback regarding the study questions.

If you fail a third time; repeat the above instructions and send us your additional feedback regarding the study questions. send your third exam feed back questions.

You will receive a 200% course Refund; after completing the above tasks and have actively participated in the Contractors Circle we will refund 200% of your original course purchase price. If you passed one of your exams but failed to pass the other we will refund you for only the exam you failed three times.

To receive your 200% Refund; just return all your course materials and comply with the above tasks. 200% Refund, NO QUESTIONS ASKED!

Please follow and like us:

CSLB

As I’ve discussed before, the Contractors State License Board CSLB has begun a very progressive approach to verifying trade experience.

It’s come to my attention that the licensing exam unit at the CSLB has been instructed to begin calling employers and certifiers to verify experience. The exam unit was told this last Friday, 4/5/13.

What does this mean? You better have your ducks in a row and have back up verification of your experience.

Per the CSLB rules: They do not visit worksites, they won’t accept photos of your work, the burden of proof is on you, the applicant… and here’s my favorite part…The CSLB states that the exam tells them if you know your trade.

cslb

So, if they call you or your employer or your certifier, you have to be able to provide verifiable evidence of your experience. Here’s the fun part…the CSLB states: “All experience claims must be verified by a qualified and responsible person, such as a homeowner, an employer, fellow employee, other journeymen, contractor, union representative, building inspector, architect, or engineer. The person verifying your claim must have firsthand knowledge of your experience during the time period covered—that is, he or she must have observed the work that you have completed and must complete the Certification of Work Experience form included with the application.​

Even if you provide a Certification of Work Experience form, be prepared to furnish documentation of any experience you claim on the form when such documentation is requested. Failure to provide this documentation will result in rejection of your application or denial of the license.”

What they are not telling you is that, even if you follow the certifier instructions, and even though that certifier is signing under the penalty of perjury, they (the cslb) are still going to call your employer or certifier to verify your experience. My question is… why bother having someone certify your experience in the first place? If daddy is going to check up on you anyway, what’s the point? And if the exam tells them whether or not you know your trade, why have certifiers and why call them?

What is the down side for some of you? You may be applying without your employer knowing that you are applying. Why, because your employer may not appreciate the fact that you are trying to obtain your own license. And when the CSLB comes calling, the employer is going to find out about your application and your job could be in jeopardy. Thanks CSLB.

Does the CSLB care about this little fact? Of course not. Their concern is not your livelihood, your well being, or your ability to earn a living and to feed your family. It never has been. Their “prime directive” if you will, is to ensure that licenses are issued to qualified persons.

Do I agree with their unpublished, unannounced ruling to begin calling employers and certifiers? No! Their own rule states that the exam tells them if you know the trade. So what they are doing basically cutting off the hand that feeds them. If they allow you to take the test and issue you a license, the CSLB will be earning renewal fees for years. By finding ways to keep you from getting your license, they are limiting their ability to generate funds.

Typical CSLB, they make up stupid rules without thinking about the consequences.

Please follow and like us: